Kevin Schroeder’s Bears Player Performance Grades vs Ravens

Kevin Schroeder’s Bears Player Performance Grades vs Ravens

(An error by the editor has been corrected to show the actual defensive coordinator at Michigan University.)

Great teams in the NFL know how to win games. They know how to come from behind. They know how to crush a team in the 4th quarter if they hold a lead. It’s what separates them from the also-rans. If the Bears want to be a great team, they have to finish games and put teams away. They still have a way to go when playing from behind. As for when they’re leading in the 4th quarter the Bears are not putting on any clinics. While they did win the two games they had 4th quarter leads… they also blew those leads and had to win in overtime. A year ago, they would have found a way to lose them. Progress.

Player Performance Grades

The grading scale goes from -3 to +3 for each play. Penalties are counted in whatever phase they were committed. “Short” throws are 10 yards or less, “Medium” is 10-20, “Deep” is over 20. Everything else (scrambles, throwaways, etc.) is under “Miscellaneous.”

If Watching On A Phone You May Need To View Graphics In LandScape Format

Bears Performance

Bears player performance

Tarik Cohen threw a touchdown pass and I had no idea where to put that in the chart, so now everyone gets a “Miscellaneous” column. Expect mostly negative numbers there as it will largely consist of pre-snap and post-play penalties. As far as this affecting cumulative grades for the season, the only guy who should be appreciably affected is Cody Whitehair, as bad snaps are going in the Misc. column now.

So what happened?

Well, for a second straight week, I had to wait for the all-22 to find out. Last week saw a bunch of wonky camera angles that made it tough to tell what was happening. This week, the director was straight-up missing plays.

Anyway, on to the game itself. The defense kicked butt. Ravens drive chart:

Start Spot Plays Yards Time Result
15:00 1Q BAL 27 3 9 2:12 Punt
8:14 1Q BAL 9 5 14 3:01 Punt
1:48 1Q BAL 11 3 -1 1:35 Punt
10:54 2Q BAL 28 5 52 3:05 Fumble
6:29 2Q BAL 26 5 18 2:53 INT
2:53 2Q BAL 18 3 6 0:46 Punt
1:40 2Q BAL 36 12 55 1:37 FG
11:44 3Q BAL 16 3 4 2:02 Punt
4:12 3Q BAL 30 3 3 1:45 Punt
0:24 3Q CHI 39 10 26 3:58 FG
9:21 4Q BAL 48 7 22 4:13 INT
5:08 4Q BAL 25 10 44 2:12 FG
0:12 4Q BAL 44 1 16 0:12 End of regulation
7:04 OT BAL 40 3 8 1:24 Punt

The Ravens got six points when not starting in Bears territory. The defense got the Bears seven points and on the doorstep for another seven. That says not-so-great things about the offense, but we’ll get to that later. Right now, we’re talking about the defense and being happy. We’re six games into the season and the defense’s worst performance was an outing in Green Bay that still would have been good enough for the team to get a win if the offense had been at all competent. Six games is not a coincidence – this defense is legit.

Akiem Hicks was a major problem once again, finishing with the same outstanding score he had a week ago, this time the result of a great day rushing the passer. Eddie Goldman had a handful of biffs, but more than made up for them. He’s coming along nicely. Jonathan Bullard was solid when called upon. Given that he was good and Mitch Unrein looked kinda meh, I’d like to see Bullard’s role expand. The Bears went with four down linemen on a handful of snaps, usually with Leonard Floyd and Sam Acho as the OLBs. Acho had a strong outing. Floyd had a nice day rushing the passer, but was less effective against the run and had a bad neutral zone infraction penalty on 4th and 4 late in the game. Inside, Danny Trevathan was excellent. Kyle Fuller and both safeties had very strong games. Bryce Callahan was solid in coverage but caught a -2 when he didn’t force Bobby Rainey back inside on 3rd and 17 late in the first half. The clock stopped at 23 seconds after he was tackled out of bounds (Christian Jones was flagged for unnecessary roughness), if Rainey’s forced back inside, you’re looking at 20 seconds, give or take, to get the field goal unit on for kick on a field that guys were slipping on all day. It’s enough time, sure, but still, put a little pressure on if you can. That poor situational awareness would rear its ugly head on the other side of the ball at the end of the second half, which I guess is as good of a segue as any to talk about the offense.

The offense was uh, not great. Bears drive chart:

Start Spot Plays Yards Time Result
12:48 1Q CHI 7 10 45 4:34 Punt
5:13 1Q CHI 25 5 17 3:25 Punt
0:13 1Q CHI 35 10 60 4:19 FG
7:49 2Q CHI 20 3 9 1:20 Punt
3:36 2Q BAL 20 2 20 0:43 TD
2:07 2Q CHI 35 3 -9 0:27 Punt
0:03 2Q CHI 25 1 -1 0:03 End of half
15:00 3Q CHI 26 6 26 3:16 Punt
9:42 3Q CHI 34 7 66 3:41 TD
5:47 3Q CHI 20 3 0 1:35 Punt
2:27 3Q CHI 21 4 18 2:03 Fumble
11:26 4Q CHI 44 5 8 2:05 Fumble
2:56 4Q CHI 17 4 7 1:19 Punt
1:37 4Q CHI 25 3 -2 1:25 Punt
10:00 OT CHI 20 4 12 2:56 Punt
5:40 OT CHI 7 8 71 5:40 FG

In regulation, they put together two extended drives for 10 points. That’s not going to be good enough to win games where the defense isn’t totally lights-out and this is where I have to ask “what in the world was Loggains thinking?” John Harbaugh’s brother, Jim, is the head coach at Michigan (no, he’s not going to be the Bears coach next year, let’s get that out of the way right now). Jim’s defensive coordinator is Don Brown, whose defensive philosophy is “solve your problems with aggression.” That’s what the Ravens tried to do to the Bears and it pretty much worked. The Ravens got extra aggressive with their OLBs to take away opportunities for Trubisky to rollout. The aggressiveness also makes zone running difficult and that’s how you get run blocking scores like the Bears had despite the backs going for 3 yards per carry if you exclude Howard’s long run in OT. Upon seeing what the Ravens were doing, one might change up your game plan and start throwing some quick passes. That’s something your receiver group can actually handle. Dowell Loggains, though, kept doing the same stuff. And now this is all on film. It’s going to come up again, Dowell. I really hope you have a plan here besides “save me, Vic.”

Speaking of banging your head against the wall, why is Dion Sims still getting so many snaps? His blocking has graded out positively only once and this week, he wasn’t even close. He had a touchdown catch this week, but by and large, isn’t a major threat as a receiver. So what’s the point? There is no way Adam Shaheen can be worse than this.

Speaking of bad blocking, the pass pro was real bad. The primary culprits were Kyle Long and Josh Sitton – it’s a safe bet that it won’t be like this every week.

Trubisky was fine – he didn’t try to force things as much this week. He missed one medium pass to Sims and didn’t give Tanner Gentry a shot on a deep pass. However, he also put a deep pass on the money for Sims for a touchdown and made an excellent play on 3rd and 11 in OT, stepping out of the pocket and putting a pass where only Wright could get it. Jordan Howard was instrumental in the win – he was steady in regulation and then busted a big run in OT. He had one pretty big screw-up, going out of bounds on a 3rd down run with the Bears looking to just kill the clock and play overtime.

#FireFox (not the Mozilla product) status:

Lots of 4th quarter screw-ups by the Bears coaching staff.

The special teams play was awful, there were too many mental screw-ups, and the offense was maddeningly conservative. The only guy I definitely wouldn’t can right now is Vic Fangio.

The team sits at 2-4 with the Lions one game ahead and coming back to Earth and the Packers and Vikings two games ahead with quarterback positions consisting of “questionable” and “gaping hole,” respectively after Rodgers went down with a broken collarbone in Sunday’s game between those two teams. This is still probably not a playoff team, especially if Loggains is content to keep farting around on offense. But there’s a chance.

Staley Nickels

In regulation, they put together two extended drives for 10 points. That’s not going to be good enough to win games where the defense isn’t totally lights-out and this is where I have to ask “what in the world was Loggains thinking?” John Harbaugh’s brother, Jim, is the head coach at Michigan (no, he’s not going to be the Bears coach next year, let’s get that out of the way right now). Jim’s defensive coordinator is Don Brown, whose defensive philosophy is “solve your problems with aggression.” That’s what the Ravens tried to do to the Bears and it pretty much worked. The Ravens got extra aggressive with their OLBs to take away opportunities for Trubisky to rollout. The aggressiveness also makes zone running difficult and that’s how you get run blocking scores like the Bears had despite the backs going for 3 yards per carry if you exclude Howard’s long run in OT. Upon seeing what the Ravens were doing, one might change up your game plan and start throwing some quick passes. That’s something your receiver group can actually handle. Loggains, though, kept doing the same stuff. And now this is all on film. It’s going to come up again, Dowell. I really hope you have a plan here besides “save me, Vic.”

Speaking of banging your head against the wall, why is Dion Sims still getting so many snaps? His blocking has graded out positively only once and this week, he wasn’t even close. He had a touchdown catch this week, but by and large, isn’t a major threat as a receiver. So what’s the point? There is no way Shaheen can be worse than this.

Speaking of bad blocking, the pass pro was real bad. The primary culprits were Long and Sitton – it’s a safe bet that it won’t be like this every week.

Trubisky was fine – he didn’t try to force things as much this week. He missed one medium pass to Sims and didn’t give Gentry a shot on a deep pass. However, he also put a deep pass on the money for Sims for a touchdown and made an excellent play on 3rd and 11 in OT, stepping out of the pocket and putting a pass where only Wright could get it. Jordan Howard was instrumental in the win – he was steady in regulation and then busted a big run in OT. He had one pretty big screw-up, going out of bounds on a 3rd down run with the Bears looking to just kill the clock and play overtime.

#FireFox (not the Mozilla product) status: Only not “should’ve left him in Baltimore” because there’s a chance (small, but existent) that he’s a big factor in the defense’s success.

The special teams play was awful, there were too many mental screw-ups, and the offense was maddeningly conservative. The only guy I definitely wouldn’t can right now is Fangio.

The team sits at 2-4 with the Lions one game ahead and coming back to Earth and the Packers and Vikings two games ahead with quarterback positions consisting of “questionable” and “gaping hole,” respectively after Rodgers went down with a broken collarbone in Sunday’s game between those two teams. This is still probably not a playoff team, especially if Loggains is content to keep farting around on offense. But there’s a chance.

Staley Nickels Count

Would love to hear your thoughts… hit me up on Twitter @KSchroeder_312

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Kevin Schroeder

Kevin Schroeder

Football guy, be it NFL or college, even the CFL. If you take football out of his life, he's not going to function well. Kevin also writes about Michigan football and Blackhawks hockey at goodifitgoes.com. Find him on Twitter @KSchroeder_312.



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